Captain's Log

Adventures from previous trips

 

 

May 30, 2010 May 30, 2010 May 30, 2010 May 30, 2010 May 30, 2010

May 30, 2010

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May 30, 2010

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May 30, 2010

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The Original Dolphin Watch

May 30, 2010

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May 30, 2010

Please join us for our 10th Annual Dive Week

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Archives

May 30, 2010

May 30, 2010 by Michael

Texas Clipper dive with Sea Sports of NW Houston.  A group of divers ranging from the newly certified to technical wreck penetration encountered strong currents today. Everyone was up to the task and safely made two dives on the Clipper.  Fish were abundant as they too sought shelter from the unusually strong current.  Blue water was on the Clipper and divers reported being able to see the bottom of the Diver 1 from the top of the Clipper (70 feet) and water temps were in the high 70s at depth and low 80s near the surface.

May 29, 2010

May 29, 2010 by Michael

Sea Sports of Northwest Houston made the trek to SPI for the Memorial Day weekend.  Today’s dive was to Little Sara where diver’s encountered schools of lane snapper, lookdowns, octopus and very large barracuda and a variety of other fish.  Water temps were in the high 70s to lower 80s.  Water clarity is getting good. Blue water is in near shore and diver’s reported visibility to be anywhere from 40 – 50 feet at depths above 60 fsw.

May 28, 2010

May 28, 2010 by Michael

Flat calm seas ruled the day on a trip to the Texas Clipper.  Seas less than 2 feet created idyllic conditions for a day on the water. Below the surface currents were moderate, but nothing divers could not handle.  Water temp was 80 at the surface and around 75 at depth.  Visibility varied greatly depending on where divers were on the wreck.  The best was reported to be around 60 ft at a location along the keel of the ship.  Thanks again to Mark Haynes for supplying us with great pics for the log.

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May 22, 2010

May 22, 2010 by Michael

Just enough of a break in weather in make it out to Little Sara today.  The wind has been blowing, as it usually does this time of year, but divers braved the 3 – 5 ft seas to enjoy a great dive.  Water temp is up near 80 F now and viz was around 30 – 40 ft.  Spearfishermen shot some Atlantic spadefish, sheepsheads and grey snapper.  Thanks to local diver Mark Haynes for providing pictures for the Capt’s Log!

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May 8, 2010

May 8, 2010 by Michael

Today we made our way to the Iron Reef, Little Sara. Divers were treated to spectacular schools of fish including snapper, lookdowns, spadefish, and jack cravelle. A large barracuda was also spotted along with butterfly fish, coco damsels, wrasse, and blennys. Conditions were very good with visibility in the 50 to 60 foot range with blue water and moderate seas.  Water temps were 77 at the surface and 72 at the bottom.

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May 6, 2010

May 6, 2010 by Michael

Divers went to the Texas Clipper today and reported conditions as “fantastic”. The divers’ splendor was influenced by a plethora of marine life.  Colorful schools of Liutjanus campechanus enacted springtime dances of ritual mating and delicate bristle worms fell like snowflakes on technical divers continuing their penetration of the bowels of the Texas Clipper.

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May 5, 2010

May 5, 2010 by Michael

Today divers went out to the Texas Clipper and were treated to calm seas and fair visibility.  Water temp was around 75 degrees and lots and lots of fish were seen on all parts of the wreck.  A group of Technical Divers laid permanent line inside the Clipper and American Diving’s Technical dive team is available to lead wreck penetration divers on guided tours inside the wreck.

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May 4, 2010

May 4, 2010 by Michael

A class of Advanced divers made two dives on the wreck of the Deep Six today.  They were treated to large schools of snapper and Atlantic spadefish.  Visibility was around 30 feet above the wreckage and water temp was 75 degrees.

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